Thursday, 21 July 2016

Unfinished Business – Mont Ventoux

We made it.....
Epic is an oft overused adjective, but the focal point of this year’s Tour de France trip is fully worthy of its use. Folklore and myths surround Mont Ventoux, and these only serve to increase its magnetism to cyclists. As soon as the 2016 route was confirmed, the deal was done.

Two of us had unfinished business with the ‘Giant of Provence’, having come so close to making it to the top in 2009 only to be thwarted by the closure of the road as Armstrong (remember him?), a pre Vegetarian Contador, as well as our very own Wiggo approached.

We’d learnt a valuable lesson in 2009, and this time our plan was to avoid the melee of race day.  Instead our plan was to attempt to ride it on the day before; as things turned out this was a very wise decision indeed.

We may have avoided the race itself, but as we rode across to Bedoin at the base of ascent, it was clear we’d another challenge to deal with when making our ascent. Ventoux was living up to its name, but having come this far, there was no turning back now.

Much has been written about the climb itself by those far more eloquent then I, and all I can add is that it’s an absolute brute. Unrelenting, the gradient gives no rest bite on the way up. No false flats or hairpins to give you a moment, or even to snatch back a precious gear (before almost always giving it back again), just a constant grind.

It was only when leaving the shelter of the lower slopes’ wooded section that the severity of the wind started to become apparent. Passing a flagpole snapped clean in half, I began to fear for the worst. Surely I wouldn’t be scuppered for the second time, would I?

Less than 5km to go and it was getting worse. Safety barriers were being blown over, and turning one corner I came about as close to stopping as I think it’s possible to do without actually coming to a halt. Fortunately the road soon turned again and I managed to regain some momentum.

As the final corner approached I could hardly believe my eyes. People were off their bikes and pushing, and one chap was on his hands and knees seemingly clinging on to his bike for dear life. I’d never seen anything quite like it before. Somehow this sight gave me one last boost, and from somewhere I’m not sure I knew existed I summoned up one last effort. I swept round the corner, and suddenly the wind was gone; the shelter offered by the weather station at the summit making the last 100m or so perhaps the easiest of the day.

Finally, almost 7 years since I first set out to tackle this most iconic of climbs, I was at the top. Another one of the big ones to tick off the list. The weather had added another dimension which I’d not planned for, and it limited time at the summit to a minimum as the cold conditions bit hard. After a couple of pictures it was time for the descent of a lifetime, but that’s another story……

Vive La Velo

@936ADL