Wednesday, 10 August 2016

SCCA 4-Up Championships – Race Report

Let the pain begin......
After last year’s successful debut in what’s without a doubt the standout event in the county’s time trialling calendar, we were back for more in Sunday’s 2016 SCCA 4-Up Championships. And what’s more, when the start list came out we had a bone fide cycling superstar in our midst, Dame Sarah Storey. It was only after a little more research that I realised quite how much she’d won. 11 time Paralympic champion, 27 time world champion, and the holder of no less than 72 world records. Quite a coup for the SCCA, and to see someone signing on to an event that we were riding in a world champions jersey (earned not purchased I might add) was a vaguely surreal experience.

The exposed north Shropshire plain always seems to be windy, and the forecast gusty weather arrived as predicted. And as is all too often the case, the wind direction was going to make the return leg of the event just brutal. At least it was dry.

Warm up complete, we lined up on at the start. 1 minute…..30 secs…10…5..4..3..2..1…We were off, all clipped in and quickly up to race pace. After a check to confirm that we were all present and correct, it was time to get settled in. Even though our practice session had been short, it was paying dividends from the off and our changes where going smoothly.

One of the standout features of this event is the level of support enjoyed along the route. When the going is getting tough it’s amazing the difference a friendly face and cheer can make. It really does make a difference, so thanks to all who came out to the course to show their support.

The wind really made itself felt at the first turn onto the Hodnet bypass. With a tailwind and slightly downhill to boot, we seemed to be absolutely flying along, seemingly oblivious to what this would mean on the return leg. Our progress was still good as we headed out to the turn, and we were still riding smoothly and sharing the work on the front.

Past the 20 mile marker and we were about to face the toughest part of the day. Less than 2 miles in length, but wide open: into a block headwind, and uphill for the final couple of hundred metres. Suddenly the ease with which we’d ridden this part of the course in the opposite direction a few minutes earlier, came back to bite us. In an instant our cohesion was in tatters as the gradient took its tool. The nature of the event meant we had no choice other than to regroup, and try and recover.

Back as a unit we made the final turn for home, less than 6 miles to go: disaster averted and we were ready for one final push. Past the infamous (on Strava at least) Peplow Pave and we were in the home straight.

It was time to empty the tanks and leave it all out there on the road. Thankfully the final few hundred metres were downhill, across the line, and suddenly it was all over. I think we were all pleased with how things had gone on what was a really very difficult course, made all the worse by the wind.

What followed was a very gentle return to race HQ for coffee and cake (a crucial part of post TT tradition), and soon after came the official results. Dame Sarah’s team were pushed into second by the oh so impressive local team from Rhino Velo, but where did we end up? 14th on the day, and although we missed out 1:20 target by 55 seconds, I was pleased with the time given the conditions.

Although riding in society colours, all of the team this year were also Wrekin Sport CC members and so we were also riding for the club’s prestigious ;¬) 4-Up Championship Trophy. What’s more we won it! Amazing……

Vive la Velo

@936ADL

Friday, 5 August 2016

Respect The Jersey

It was as we turned the corner that we caught our first glimpse of him. A lone cyclist, perhaps two or  three hundred metres ahead of us on the road. Like us, enjoying an August Tuesday evening ride. As the road ahead rose ever so slightly and the gap closed, it became clear that all was not as it seemed. There was I thinking that Peter Sagan was in Rio for the upcoming Olympics, but no, there he was up ahead, resplendent in the unmistakeable rainbow bands of the World Champions jersey. And the gap was still closing fast……..

Hang on a moment, where was the #ManBun? As we got closer it became clear that it wasn’t Sagan after all; it was none other than the #ManxMissille himself, presumably reminiscing about his time with Sir Brad and Team Sky. He certainly looked different in the flesh; much taller than I’d expected.

As we caught him, the illusion was shattered. No it wasn’t Cav, it was someone guilty of what is in the eyes of many, a cycling crime. That is, to wear a Jersey you’ve not earned. This is a hot topic in any cycling group, and one that almost always generates a lively debate.

Absolutely agreed that people can wear what they like, but to my mind respecting the Jersey, perhaps the very essence of what makes cycling such a special sport, is something which we should all do.

Vive la Velo

@936ADL

Thursday, 21 July 2016

Unfinished Business – Mont Ventoux

We made it.....
Epic is an oft overused adjective, but the focal point of this year’s Tour de France trip is fully worthy of its use. Folklore and myths surround Mont Ventoux, and these only serve to increase its magnetism to cyclists. As soon as the 2016 route was confirmed, the deal was done.

Two of us had unfinished business with the ‘Giant of Provence’, having come so close to making it to the top in 2009 only to be thwarted by the closure of the road as Armstrong (remember him?), a pre Vegetarian Contador, as well as our very own Wiggo approached.

We’d learnt a valuable lesson in 2009, and this time our plan was to avoid the melee of race day.  Instead our plan was to attempt to ride it on the day before; as things turned out this was a very wise decision indeed.

We may have avoided the race itself, but as we rode across to Bedoin at the base of ascent, it was clear we’d another challenge to deal with when making our ascent. Ventoux was living up to its name, but having come this far, there was no turning back now.

Much has been written about the climb itself by those far more eloquent then I, and all I can add is that it’s an absolute brute. Unrelenting, the gradient gives no rest bite on the way up. No false flats or hairpins to give you a moment, or even to snatch back a precious gear (before almost always giving it back again), just a constant grind.

It was only when leaving the shelter of the lower slopes’ wooded section that the severity of the wind started to become apparent. Passing a flagpole snapped clean in half, I began to fear for the worst. Surely I wouldn’t be scuppered for the second time, would I?

Less than 5km to go and it was getting worse. Safety barriers were being blown over, and turning one corner I came about as close to stopping as I think it’s possible to do without actually coming to a halt. Fortunately the road soon turned again and I managed to regain some momentum.

As the final corner approached I could hardly believe my eyes. People were off their bikes and pushing, and one chap was on his hands and knees seemingly clinging on to his bike for dear life. I’d never seen anything quite like it before. Somehow this sight gave me one last boost, and from somewhere I’m not sure I knew existed I summoned up one last effort. I swept round the corner, and suddenly the wind was gone; the shelter offered by the weather station at the summit making the last 100m or so perhaps the easiest of the day.

Finally, almost 7 years since I first set out to tackle this most iconic of climbs, I was at the top. Another one of the big ones to tick off the list. The weather had added another dimension which I’d not planned for, and it limited time at the summit to a minimum as the cold conditions bit hard. After a couple of pictures it was time for the descent of a lifetime, but that’s another story……

Vive La Velo

@936ADL

Wednesday, 29 June 2016

Share the Passion

It's nearly time......
Here we go again; with only a few days to go to this year’s Grand Depart from Mont Saint-Michel, the excitement’s building nicely. It really doesn’t seem like a year ago that I blogged on a similar subject.

2015 was a truly special year in so many respects, especially being able to share the experience for the first time with @ASL191. The sheer madness of Dutch Corner on race day is an experience that every cycling fan should try and sample, it’s insane.

So, what of this year’s Grand Boucle? As ever, a mix of old favourites as well as new towns, roads, and climbs. It’s this ever changing landscape of all the Grand Tours which make them all so special in their own right.

This year’s SCS pilgrimage is serving as an opportunity for 2 of us to revisit unfinished business. It was back in 2009 that Si and I first visited the ‘Giant of Provence’, the legendary Mont Ventoux. We had a lot to learn back then, not least to realise that to try and ride the big climbs on race day is destined to failure. Our efforts finally failed at the 2km to go mark. This year hopefully we’ll make it to the top, paying our respects at the Tommy Simpson memorial as we pass.

As far as the race itself goes there’s much to look forward too. Cancellara’s final tour, Cav’s final shot at that oh so elusive Maillot Jaune, and can Froome make it a hat trick of wins? Whatever happens between now and the final Champs-Elysees sprint royale on Sunday July 24 th , there’s sure to be drama at every turn. Good luck to all those riding, I take my hat off to each and every one of you.

Vive la Velo

@936ADL

Saturday, 25 June 2016

The Night Shift

More Caffeine Required

Some ideas are just so stupid that they make perfect sense……

Last Friday saw one such idea realised. As we gathered for a final pre ride espresso in the ever   excellent No 5, the nervous energy was almost palpable. Six of us had risen to the challenge, and I    was quietly confident that we were all up it.

It was just after 7 as we rolled out of town; a long night lay ahead of us. Escaping our own locality was the first challenge, to leave the familiar roads surrounding Shifnal behind. This in itself takes a good while, and it wasn’t until the light began to fade that we were on unknown roads. A brief feed stop in Winsford coincided with darkness falling.

Lights on and suddenly it all felt very different, but fortunately the weather was being kind to us, not too cold, and perhaps most importantly, we were rain free. The 100km mark was passed, and we rolled into our mid ride feedzone just a few minutes before midnight.

I’m not sure we were entirely typical of the average McDonalds customer at that hour of the day, but the food certainly hit the spot, and the caffeine top up was also very welcome. Friday became Saturday, and it was soon time to get back on the bikes, we had a date with Simon in Ellesmere in a little over 3 hours.

The next couple of hours were to my mind the toughest. It was time to just stick in there and keep the pedals turning. Drunken revellers staggering home in various states of intoxication provided entrertainment as we passed through Queensferry and Connah’s Quay, and my spirits lifted further as we turned south back towards home.

Simon was duly collected as planned; six became seven, and the added manpower gave us all a lift. Baschurch came and went, and the early signs of the sunrise to follows were becoming apparent. The early cloud cover delayed things a while, and also had the effect of allowing the sun to appear as suddenly as light being switched on. Even at this early hour the sun brought with it some welcome warmth, and gave everyone a much needed boost.

Another encounter with the Golden Arches followed in Shrewsbury, and the large espresso had perhaps never been more welcome. 10 hours since we left Shifnal, and over 220km covered; we were in the home straight.

The final short leg home from Shrewsbury passed in a blur; we were all pretty much on auto-pilot (rider?) by this point. Dai turned off as we went through Wellington, and we had one final hurdle in our way, known locally as Aldi Huez. I was in survival mode at this stage, and it was just a case of spin it out and get to the top. Mark had other plans, and simply flew up the climb. Impressive stuff, especially given the night’s previous efforts.

As we rolled back into town, it was pretty much exactly 12 hours since we’d left the previous evening. 255km covered, in a little under 10 hours riding time.

Gary suggested finishing off with a beer, a Belgian Tripel of course. That was the second stupid idea…..

Vive la Velo

@936ADL

Thursday, 16 June 2016

The Jersey

Mont Ventoux Special Edition


There’s perhaps nothing more emblematic in the world of cycling than ‘The Jersey’. From the Maillot Jaune worn by the leader of the world’s greatest race, to the rainbow stripes of the World Champion, all have their own unique tale to tell. Whole books (see Inrng's review here) have been written about them, so it seemed only right to put together a short blog on our very own sacred garment, the SCS Jersey.

Whilst the basic design of our jersey hasn’t changed since it was so painstakingly put together back in 2013 by @ASL191 & @ObsessiveJohn, we’ve just taken delivery of the latest special edition. I may be biased,  but this latest one is possibly the best yet. A huge thanks to the ever excellent Steve from @Pente14 for his help. (check out his site – www.pente14.com – if you want very reasonably priced, top quality custom cycling gear)

These have been designed with this year’s trip to the Tour de France in mind, and more specifically it’s ascent of the legendary Mont Ventoux. If the design looks vaguely familiar, that’s no surprise. It’s a nod to Tommy Simpson, the first British male world road race champion who tragically lost his life on this mountain in 1967.

May all who wear this jersey do so with pride, along with a solid commitment to do it the justice it deserves.

Vive la Velo
@936ADL

Thursday, 19 May 2016

The Perfect Commute?

Just Perfect
It was just too good an opportunity to miss. A lovely morning; the wet and cold conditions of last week a distant memory, now replaced with a feeling that summer was on its way.

With the trusty Pompino temporarily off the road with a very poorly front wheel, my CX bike has become the commuter of choice, and today it was ideal. My plan was to tailor the route in to make the most of its strengths.

Climbing out of gorge on the Silkin Way, the bike was in its element. Currently still wearing the 28mm slicks employed for the Liege Bastogne Liege trip, it was the perfect match for the hard packed path beneath.

The steady gradient offered by the converted railway line makes getting into a steady rhythm second nature, and as the hard pack path gives way to tarmac and the gradient eases, the speed builds naturally.

I was making good time, and with the drudgery of the day ahead looming large, it was time to take a moment. Time to reflect on last 50 or so minutes. Not the longest, nor the fastest commute, but in so many ways the perfect encapsulation of how special it is to be able to ride to work.

With an espresso in hand, it made me think. Had I just enjoyed the perfect commute?

Vive la Velo

@936ADL